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166 S Broad St
Meriden, CT 06450
Warning Signs Dentures May be in Your Future

Warning Signs Dentures May be in Your Future

You may expect you won’t need dentures because you take good care of your teeth. However, dentures are more prevalent than you may think. The number of adults in the United States needing dentures is expected to increase from 33 million in 1991 to 37 million in 2020. If you are wondering how likely you are to keep your teeth, here are some warning signs that may indicate dentures are in your future.

  • You don’t visit your dentist twice a year for regular checkups and routine cleaning. Gum disease and tooth decay are the leading causes of tooth loss; therefore, it is critical to be proactive with dental care to prevent problems that could cause the need for extraction.
  • You have gums that are swollen, tender, red, or bleeding which are indications of periodontal disease. Left untreated, gum disease is the primary cause of adult tooth loss.
  • Your teeth have become loose, are shifting, or have developed wider gaps between them that can indicate bone loss from gum disease.
  • You have severe tooth pain that could be a sign that decay has progressed and is attacking the nerve at the center of the tooth. Once tooth decay has advanced, it is more likely your tooth will need to be removed.
  • You are already missing several of your teeth. If you are missing more than two teeth, it is important to replace them with some sort of prosthesis to keep pressure off of your remaining teeth.
  • It is difficult for you to eat hard candy or chewy foods, which may indicate a cracked tooth, cavities, or gum disease.
  • If you suffer from recurring stomach aches or indigestion, it may be a sign of dental problems. When you can’t chew properly, you end up swallowing larger pieces of food which is hard on your digestion.

Tooth loss does not happen overnight. With proper oral hygiene and regular dental visits, you may be able to avoid or delay the need for dentures in your future.

We look forward to seeing you in our Meriden dental office

Types of Dental Crown and Bridge Materials Available

Types of Dental Crown and Bridge Materials Available

Restorative dentistry has made incredible advancements in the technology of restorative dental materials, and there are more options than ever today for your dental crown or dental bridge. Zirconium and porcelain have proven to provide lasting strength and durability, exhibiting the most natural cosmetic dental restorations available today. Each tooth in each mouth is different, however, and in some cases, resin composite or metal alloy might be the choice recommended for you.

Metals are a common choice for dental crowns and dental bridges. Gold or palladium alloys, as well as chromium or nickel (base-metal) alloys can be excellent choices. Metal alloy crowns show the least “wear down” over years of use. They almost never chip, break or wear down opposing teeth. The primary complaint about metal alloy materials is that their color is metallic and thereby unnatural. They will not blend with the surrounding teeth, and as such, they are chosen more for back molars where they won’t draw attention.

Dental composite/resin materials are a popular choice that can be made to blend with the surrounding teeth, but they’ve been shown to wear down over time and are more prone to fractures and breaking than other materials.

Porcelain can be fused to metal to form a natural-appearing crown or bridge, and because of their appearance, are a good choice for front or back teeth. Over time, however, discoloration can appear along the gum line as the porcelain wears away, leaving a dark, unsightly line. The porcelain can be fused to zirconium, however, which eliminates the dark line and is a good cosmetic choice for front teeth.

Crowns and bridges can also be made from all-porcelain or all-ceramic materials. These materials are the best choice for natural-looking teeth of the types of dental crown and dental bridge materials available in restorative dentistry today. Because they contain no metal, they are excellent choices for patients with metal allergies. They tend to be weaker and less durable than materials containing metals, however.

Talk to your cosmetic dentist today with any questions you have regarding what type of dental crown or bridge material is best for your smile needs.

We treat patients from Meriden and the surrounding area

Am I a Candidate for Dental Implants?

Am I a Candidate for Dental Implants?

People are talking about dental implants. They’re talking about what a secure, longterm solution they are for patients with missing teeth and how successful they are for dental patients of all types. Are you wondering if you’re a candidate for dental implant treatment? The answer is yes, you probably are!

The one factor that’s a must for being a dental implant candidate is that you must have a missing tooth. The AAOMS (American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons) estimates that as many as 70% of all adults have lost a minimum of one adult tooth. If you are among this group and you have a missing tooth, you’re a candidate for dental implants. Some patients are better suited to this particular treatment, however, so making an informed decision regarding your particular tooth replacement is vital.

The healthier you are, the more successful your dental implant surgery will be. Some health conditions and diseases should be strongly factored into whether or not dental implants are the best tooth replacement option. Patients with the following conditions may experience difficulty in the fusing of implant and bone:

  • Smoking
  • Cancer
  • Radiation to the jaws or face
  • Diabetes
  • Drug or alcohol dependency
  • Acute gum disease/periodontitis

Typically, a tooth is lost due to an accident, tooth decay, advanced gum disease or a failed root canal treatment. Even though the cause of the tooth’s loss might be through poor oral health, the healthier your mouth and surrounding teeth are, the more successful a dental implant will be.

Because the health of the bone is directly related to the strength of the fusion of the bone to implant, patients with healthier bones will have more successful experiences with dental implants. Maintain a diet high in calcium and other bone-nourishing nutrients and drink plenty of fluids.

If you need a dentist in Meriden contact us today

Oral Cancer Explained

Oral Cancer Explained

Most people have friends or family who have had to deal with the disease cancer in some area of the body. Cancer can be described as uncontrollable cell growth that invades and damages surrounding tissue. Oral cancer often shows up as a persistent sore or growth in the mouth, but also includes cancers of the tongue, lips, cheeks, palate, throat, and sinuses. Like most cancers, it can be life threatening without early detection and treatment.

Symptoms

Common symptoms of oral cancer include:

  • Swelling, lumps, or rough spots on your lips, gums, or other mouth areas
  • White or red patches in your mouth
  • Numbness or tenderness in your mouth, neck, or face
  • Unexplained bleeding in your mouth
  • Sore throat or feeling that something is stuck in your throat
  • Persistent sores in the mouth, neck or face that bleed easily and do not heal in two weeks
  • Hoarseness or chronic sore throat
  • Difficulty swallowing, chewing, talking, or moving your jaw or tongue
  • Earache
  • Substantial weight loss

Risk factors

Men are at twice as high risk for oral cancer than women, and men over 50 are at greatest risk. The biggest risk factors include any kind of smoking or using smokeless tobacco, excessive alcohol consumption, excessive sun exposure, or family history of cancer. However, it’s important to know that more than 25 percent of oral cancers occur in people who do not smoke or only drink alcohol occasionally.

Diagnosis

Routine dental checkups include an examination for signs of oral cancer. A biopsy may be performed on any suspicious areas. Regular checkups are important so that tests can identify oral cancer early, before it can spread or progress.

Treatment

Oral cancer is often treated similarly to other types of cancers. It may include surgery to remove the growth, followed by radiation or chemotherapy to destroy remaining cancer cells.


If you live in the Meriden area contact us today

Comparing Oral and Intravenous Sedation

Comparing Oral and Intravenous Sedation

Sedation dentistry provides a way for those who experience anxiety or fear about visiting the dentist to get the treatment they need. It is also helping in relieving pain, and enabling more dental work to be performed in one visit. Two common methods of administering sedation are oral and intravenous (IV). Each type has its own unique characteristics and attributes.

Oral sedation involves swallowing pills or liquids. There are no shots, which is good news for patients afraid of needles. However, oral sedatives are less predictable because each medication affects people differently based on age, weight, medical history, and more. Also, there is a time delay between swallowing it and taking effect. Since the medication is absorbed through digestion, it is difficult to alter the sedation level quickly during treatment. Nearly all patients respond well to oral sedation, with few occurrences of any side effects. Patients typically don’t remember anything that occurred during treatment.

IV sedation means that the medication goes directly into the blood stream though an IV injection. A very powerful method, the effects are instant once the shot is given. If the medication begins to wear off, more can be administered through the IV for immediate results. IV sedation is very common during oral surgeries, which benefit from the ability to alter the medication dosage as needed. It is advantageous for long procedures or when multiple treatments are being done in one sitting. Patients will not remember the procedure or sometimes even the appointment at all. The biggest drawback of IV sedation is for patients who dislike needles. IV sedation requires that the dentist have special training and certification, so make sure that your dentist is qualified if this method is offered.

Both types of sedation can be effective depending on the situation and patient. Discuss your case with your dentist to help you decide which one might be the best for you.


If you need a dentist in Meriden contact us today

What’s Keeping You Up at Night?

What’s Keeping You Up at Night?

More than 12 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea, a serious condition that compromises your rest and can impact your health. Some symptoms of sleep apnea include snoring, extreme daytime tiredness, mouth breathing, and irritability. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common type of sleep apnea. Central sleep apnea, much less common, happens when the brain fails to signal your breathing muscles.

Characterized by short episodes of not breathing, which can occur from five to 50 times a night, obstructive sleep apnea is caused when the muscles in your throat relax and your airways become blocked as you sleep. Your brain senses the lack of breathing and wakes you briefly to restore airflow. These episodes disrupt sleep and keep you from feeling rested.

Not only does sleep apnea keep you from getting a good night’s rest, but it can also put your health at risk. Untreated sleep apnea has been linked to high blood pressure, risk of stroke, memory impairment, and weight gain. As well, your sleep partner may not get enough sleep because of your snoring and/or waking episodes.

If you suspect sleep apnea, talk with your dentist, who may recommend a sleep evaluation. Through overnight monitoring, a sleep specialist can determine if you suffer from sleep apnea. Treatment for sleep apnea may include lifestyle modifications such as weight loss, a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask, or an oral appliance. Your dentist can fit you for night guard that will hold your jaw in the correct position to keep your airways open.

If you live in the Meriden area contact us today